rejectionchallenge: (Default)
Your task today, if you're up to it (and as always, no need to say what you've done or whether you've done it), is to call, email, or visit a friend who treats you like you are a really good and bright person who can accomplish things. Part of being an artist is reaching out for support, because when taking risks you need support.

Did you do your morning pages today?
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Your task today, if you're up to it (and as always, no need to say what you've done or whether you've done it), is to describe your childhood room, or a favorite place from childhood. Sketch it if you like. What was your favorite thing about it? What's your favorite thing about your room or creative workspace right now? If the answer is 'nothing', do one small thing to fix that.

Did you do your morning pages today?
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Your task today, if you're up to it (and as always, no need to say what you've done or whether you've done it), is to compare your admiration lists. Look at what you really like and admire and what you think you should like and admire. Go with the really for a while, not the should.

Did you do your morning pages today?
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Your task today, if you're up to it (and as always, no need to say what you've done or whether you've done it), is to list five people you wish you had met who are dead. Now, list five people who are dead whom you'd like to hang out with for a while in eternity (or in a death-proof coffeehouse, if you're not into eternity). What traits do you find in these people that you can look for in your friends?

Did you do your morning pages today?
rejectionchallenge: (Default)
Here's more from Cameron on a concept that didn't get covered a in the original Week 00 posts:

This is quoting from p. 20-21 of The Artist's Way, chapter The Basic Tools.

Art is an image-using system. In order to create, we draw from our inner well. This inner well, an artistic reservoir, is ideally like a well-socked trout pond. We've got big fish, little fish, fat fish, skinny fish – an abundance of artistic fish to fry. As artists, we must realize that we have to maintain this artistic ecosystem. If we don't give some attention to upkeep, our well is apt to become depleted, stagnant, or blocked.


(p. 20)

”More )

I like the replenishment idea in general. The idea that inspiration has to be cultivated and nourished rather than being an unreliable random brainspark loosely correlated with insomnia (or whatever) is one of Cameron's most useful guiding metaphors for me.

What are some of the most useful ways of thinking about creativity for you? They can be from this book or from somewhere else. And how are the artist's dates going, by the way?
rejectionchallenge: (Default)
Julia Cameron, The Artist's Way, p. 62-64:

Answered prayers are scary. They imply responsibility. You asked for it. Now that you've got it, what are you going to do? Why else the cautionary phrase “Watch out for what you pray for; you just might get it”? Answered prayers deliver us back to our own hand. This is not comfortable. We find it easier to accept them as examples of synchronicity:


Some examples follow )
rejectionchallenge: (Default)
Your task today, if you're up to it (and as always, no need to say what you've done or whether you've done it), is to list five people you admire and five people you secretly admire. Are the lists the same, or different? What traits do these people have that you can cultivate in yourself?

Did you do your morning pages today?
rejectionchallenge: (Default)
Your task today, if you're up to it (and as always, no need to say what you've done or whether you've done it), is to take a look at your habits. What do you do a lot of that you don't like, and what's the benefit to you in doing them?

Some of Cameron's examples of obvious bad habits are a little iffy for me, for annoying TMI personal reasons, so I won't post them here. I assume that if you have habits you dislike or that undermine you, you know what they are. Subtler bad habits might include hanging out with people who belittle your dreams, or being willing to take on work that you can't make time for.

If you can, name three of each.

Did you do your morning pages today?
rejectionchallenge: (Default)
[Note: Due to my current, hopefully temporary state of swampedness-by-work, this week's Weekly Post is reprinted from [profile] alexconnal's original, with minor changes]

The cost of a thing is the amount of what I call life which is required to be exchanged for it, immediately or in the long run. —Henry David Thoreau

Cameron has several topics this week:

Anger is a powerful motivator, if we let it be a motivator instead of denying we feel it or burying it as deep as we can manage. For example: angry at a filmmaker for making a poorer film than one could do oneself? Time to learn how to make films. "Sloth, apathy, and despair are the enemy," says Cameron. "Anger is not. Anger is our friend. Not a nice friend. Not a gentle friend. But a very, very loyal friend. It will always tell us when we have been betrayed. It will always tell us when we have betrayed ourselves. It will always tell us that it is time to act in our own best interests." She continues, "Anger is not the action itself. It is action's invitation."

[. . .]

Shame is another weapon against us. People try to make us feel ashamed of ourselves for doing things that embarrass them. Often the making of art is among those things. A lot of criticism of art is meant to make us feel ashamed of poor art, or art that's poor in the critic's eye, but poor art is a necessity in order to get to good art and also the critic doesn't necessarily know what they're talking about. Especially if they're disparaging or dismissive or ridiculing or condemning, which are the things critics do to create shame in the person critiqued.

Of course, hardly any good art got that way without some helpful person showing the artist where to improve. Dealing with criticism is a necessity. The distinction between useful and useless criticism, however, is vital. Cameron has a list of rules for dealing with criticism of any sort:

1) Receive the criticism all the way through and get it over with.
2) Jot down notes to yourself on what concepts or phrases bother you.
3) Jot down notes on what concepts or phrases seem useful.
4) Do something very nurturing for yourself--read an old good review or recall a compliment.
5) Remember that even if you have made a truly rotten piece of art, it may be a necessary stepping-stone to your next work. Art matures spasmodically and requires ugly-duckling growth stages.
6) Look at the criticism again. Does it remind you of any criticism from your past--particularly shaming childhood criticism? Acknowledge to yourself that the current criticism is triggering grief over a long-standing wound.
7) Write a letter to the critic--not to be mailed, most probably. Defend your work and acknowledge what was helpful, if anything, in the criticism proffered.
8) Get back on the horse. Make an immediate commitment to do something creative.
9) Do it. Creativity is the only cure for criticism.


"Growth is an erratic forward movement," Cameron says: "two steps forward, one step back." A week will go really well; a week will go really poorly. Don't get discouraged. This is normal. The morning pages will seem a waste of time. They're not, but seeing them as such is also normal. Cameron suggests, as well as keeping up with the morning pages and artist's dates, being kind to yourself in small ways. Eat better; buy a house plant; take five to meditate or stretch or just be; take a moment, several times a day, to ask yourself how you're feeling, and listen to your answer, and respond kindly.

Don't forget to go on a date with your artist sometime this week, and do your morning pages every day!
alexconall: the Pleiades (Default)
Your task today, if you're up to it (and as always, no need to say what you've done or whether you've done it), is to call a friend who treats you like you are a really good and bright person who can accomplish things. Part of being an artist is reaching out for support, because when taking risks you need support.

Did you do your morning pages today?
alexconall: the Pleiades (Default)
Your task today, if you're up to it (and as always, no need to say what you've done or whether you've done it), is to describe your childhood room. Sketch it if you like. What was your favorite thing about it? What's your favorite thing about your room right now? If the answer is 'nothing', fix that.

Did you do your morning pages today?
alexconall: the Pleiades (Default)
Your task today, if you're up to it (and as always, no need to say what you've done or whether you've done it), is to compare your Monday and Tuesday lists. Look at what you really like and admire and what you think you should like and admire. Go with the really for a while, not the should.

Did you do your morning pages today?
alexconall: the Pleiades (Default)
Your task today, if you're up to it (and as always, no need to say what you've done or whether you've done it), is to list five people you wish you had met who are dead. Now, list five people who are dead whom you'd like to hang out with for a while in eternity. (Possible whether or not you believe in eternity.) What traits do you find in these people that you can look for in your friends?

Did you do your morning pages today?
alexconall: the Pleiades (Default)
Your task today, if you're up to it (and as always, no need to say what you've done or whether you've done it), is to list five people you admire and five people you secretly admire. What traits do these people have that you can cultivate in yourself?

Did you do your morning pages today?
alexconall: the Pleiades (Default)
Your task today, if you're up to it (and as always, no need to say what you've done or whether you've done it), is to take a look at your habits. What do you do a lot of that you don't like, and what's the benefit to you in doing them? Cameron's examples of obvious bad habits are smoking, too much drinking, and eating instead of writing. She lists having no time to exercise, always helping others instead of oneself, and hanging out with people who belittle one's dreams as subtler bad habits.

Name three of each.

Did you do your morning pages today?
alexconall: the Pleiades (Default)
I merely took the energy it takes to pout and wrote some blues. —Duke Ellington

The cost of a thing is the amount of what I call life which is required to be exchanged for it, immediately or in the long run. —Henry David Thoreau

Cameron has several topics this week:

anger )

synchronicity )

shame )

dealing with criticism )

growth )

Don't forget to go on a date with your artist sometime this week, and do your morning pages every day!

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August 2014

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